Outbreak of COVIG-19 deadly respiratory disease

(CNN) — Ontario’s coroner’s office says it’s investigating an increase in respiratory disease. At least six new people have died in Ontario from at least eight separate cases of COVID-19, or probable carbon monoxide…

Outbreak of COVIG-19 deadly respiratory disease

(CNN) — Ontario’s coroner’s office says it’s investigating an increase in respiratory disease.

At least six new people have died in Ontario from at least eight separate cases of COVID-19, or probable carbon monoxide poisoning, according to a report from Ontario’s Ministry of the Attorney General.

Previous records from the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General listed 840 COVID-19 deaths in 2015, up from 906 in 2013.

The ministry estimated that there are at least 2,300 new cases of COVID-19 every year in Ontario. The agency said it does not include cases in which COVID-19 victims had other causes of death, or cases where the COVID-19 death was caused by unknown causes.

In Ontario, COVID-19 is a rare but deadly and still very active cause of respiratory disease, according to the ministry. The cause and extent of COVID-19 deaths fluctuates according to the seasons, business cycles and weather conditions.

So, what is COVID-19?

COVID-19, short for “Cardio-Pulmonary Unload Reaction-129,” occurs when people keep cars running to warm them up while plugged in.

The CO convertogen, a gas, becomes trapped in cars, building and any enclosed space in which the gas is left and heats the interior up until it’s too hot to contain, CNN meteorologist Gene Norman said.

So, what can happen?

Someone who’s sick with COVIG-19 can feel like they’re having trouble breathing. Cold blankets in freezing weather can be suffocating. If COVIG-19 victims have no medical conditions, the elderly and the very young are most at risk.

Over time, these conditions can become more severe, causing complete organ failure. Those who die from COVIG-19 have respiratory damage that gives them a hard time breathing normally.

“In a typical COVIG-19 case, the victim is admitted to hospital as soon as the symptoms appear,” Ontario’s coroner’s office said in a statement. “This is when potentially lethal amounts of carbon monoxide can be detected in the blood.”

What can be done?

Most COVIG-19 deaths are from secondary COVIG-19 exposure, where someone turns on the car’s lights or opens doors while locked in.

On public-access holidays, public health officials in Ontario advise the public to stay away from secondhand or unventilated gasoline, diesel or gas-powered vehicles.

If someone suspects COVIG-19, they are advised to turn the car off and monitor the car’s engine temperature for several minutes.

It is not advised to turn on the engine, even for a moment, without checking the temperature of the vehicle.

There is no safe level of COVIG-19 exposure, according to the Ministry of the Attorney General. COVIG-19 deaths are strictly voluntary, and drivers are liable for the deaths if the fumes are left unventilated.

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