For This Company, the Future is in TV Now

As set-top boxes and smart TVs become ubiquitous, Now TV will no longer be viewed as just an on-demand service, but also as an effective distribution channel for more traditional programming. The TV channels…

For This Company, the Future is in TV Now

As set-top boxes and smart TVs become ubiquitous, Now TV will no longer be viewed as just an on-demand service, but also as an effective distribution channel for more traditional programming. The TV channels found on Now TV’s main screen were established in the UK by this British producer of children’s programming and classic fare as a film fund in the 1980s. The distributors switched out shows as their content matured and have remained as library titles ever since. But with the proliferation of smart TVs — and now, a bevy of internet-connected set-top boxes — content-owners can reach a much wider group of viewers than ever before, and on different platforms, all through one service. Thus the company decided to jump ship to the platform-agnostic Now TV.It also hopes to make a difference in the move toward measurement. First, the service does not rely on Nielsen, which has an industry-wide relationship with media buyers and sellers and generally the gold standard when it comes to popularity and therefore, advertising ratings. Now TV hopes to avoid this by expanding the scope of services to be measured by its own set of proprietary service scales.Put simply, the company knows how many sets of eyeballs are watching its content — and these detailed statistics are an advantage when a client wants to target specific groups. But Now TV also wants to offer a level of standardization — so that Nielsen’s tool is comparable to anyone else’s. This is what Now TV wants more than anything else, because at its core, this service is an indicator of growth and consumption — something that is tied to advertising and marketing spend. Nielsen, in turn, is looking to stay relevant, after experiencing a flat third quarter in 2018.Even if Now TV’s proposition fails to get traction, it has gained a stronghold in an international market, which certainly isn’t to say that it will succeed in the U.S. though that market is far more expensive and complicated than its international counterpart.

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