Echoes of volcanoes with a side of pi

Photographer Giles Yeo has used electromagnetic radiation from Earth’s atmosphere to image the inside of 13 volcanoes around the world. Each of the volcanoes is shrouded in a thick veil of volcanic ash, but…

Echoes of volcanoes with a side of pi

Photographer Giles Yeo has used electromagnetic radiation from Earth’s atmosphere to image the inside of 13 volcanoes around the world.

Each of the volcanoes is shrouded in a thick veil of volcanic ash, but can be formed on the surface from pressures inside the chamber that builds after a volcanic eruption, something that is well represented by China’s Mount Tai. Yeo asked the scientists who knew the volcano better, including a British vulcanologist, to study how they see inside the giant hole, called the pi gap.

The explosions come from inside the mountain and form an enormous hole in the Earth’s crust. “The chunks of volcano rock floating in the pia gap are like raindrops going into a sprouting tree and eventually bursting out into the Earth,” Yeo says. He photographed the pia gap using a muon detector which can detect radioactive particles in the air, but a museum-quality camera came with a different solution.

Yeo built a telescope out of bespoke lenses and supervening componentry to capture the images. His shots show how the airborne particulates from Mount Tai and the surrounding mountains are carried on to the clouds and to the eye.

Yeo has also made a video tour of the photographic challenges of Hawaii and Indonesia.

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