China celebrates Xi Jinping with five new titles

Image copyright Reuters Image caption China’s President Xi Jinping has become the country’s new party leader The Chinese Communist Party has adopted a resolution in honour of President Xi Jinping. On Wednesday, state media…

China celebrates Xi Jinping with five new titles

Image copyright Reuters Image caption China’s President Xi Jinping has become the country’s new party leader

The Chinese Communist Party has adopted a resolution in honour of President Xi Jinping.

On Wednesday, state media report that the resolution awards Xi with five titles, making him one of the most powerful leaders of the world’s second largest economy.

That resolution follows a series of decrees Xi made earlier in July – on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter – giving the President, Vice-President and other senior leaders titles and expanding the powers of the office of “chairman”.

Beijing has called for a harmonious society as it transforms itself into a leader in the innovation of the new economy.

How has Xi Jinping looked on the move over recent months?

On the streets of Beijing on Wednesday, part of the Chinese capital’s high-tech “tech village”, reactions were positive.

A spokesman at the high-tech hub, which is home to foreign multinationals such as Google and Microsoft, told the BBC he thought the moves were great for the country.

“It means he cares and he’s always providing a sense of direction and inspiration for us in this area,” the spokesman, who gave his name as Mr Chen, said.

Image copyright Getty Images Image captionXi Jinping has added that a more modern model of development can help us achieve equity

What does this mean for Xi’s political future?

The Chinese state-run media welcomed the resolution, saying it would pave the way for China to reach its goal of creating a modern socialist country by 2049 – the centenary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China.

It said the new titles included a “People’s Leader”, the “Internationalist Party”, and “People’s Red Flag.”

The author of a business blog in Beijing, Ken Cheng, wrote that while the changes were “surprising”, they do not make Xi any less powerful than he already was.

The move “may bring benefits to China and its citizens, but on the other hand, the changes will not affect the level of political risk for the country’s leaders or our global expectations”, Cheng wrote.

Until now, Xi’s father, Xi Zhongxun, was the only senior leader to hold titles besides “leader” and “president”.

Why is the media and the ruling party praising Xi?

Xi was appointed president in 2012, and is now anointed as the face of modernising China’s economy and political system.

As it is now known only through speeches and speeches, Xi’s rise to the top of the Communist Party and the government has been anything but easy, reports say.

At the age of 37, Xi himself only joined the Communist Party after the death of the country’s founding father, Chairman Mao Zedong.

The young former teacher then switched from being a philosophy professor to the organisation director of the powerful Chinese Communist Youth League, according to the state-run news agency Xinhua.

As leader of the think tank, the Center for Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Xi has led discussions on how to change the party, how to reform its organisation and governance, and how to modernise its organisational structure.

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