Athletes left with bruises as anti-government protests continue in Sudan

Multiple people were killed during protests in Sudan, in the country’s third day of demonstrations over the killing of two university students at the hands of government soldiers. Opposition figures claim security forces used…

Athletes left with bruises as anti-government protests continue in Sudan

Multiple people were killed during protests in Sudan, in the country’s third day of demonstrations over the killing of two university students at the hands of government soldiers. Opposition figures claim security forces used live ammunition against demonstrators during the protest in central Khartoum and shot dead six people in the rebel-held northern city of Saraf Omran, according to a statement from Human Rights Watch. At least two people were killed in the Nile Delta, where large anti-government protests have also been taking place for several days. The attacks came despite a call by President Omar al-Bashir to end unrest.

On Wednesday, Al Jazeera Arabic TV bureau chief Ahmed al-Majidi was arrested during pro-opposition protests outside the bureau in Khartoum.

Abdul-Wahab Abdulhadi, an opposition lawmaker and member of the Sudanese Communist Party, told Reuters that Majidi and his colleague, the New Sudanese Party’s deputy secretary general, Elie Abdelwahab Ebochi, were “detained and beaten during clashes between opposition activists and security forces.” Shortly after his arrest, the bureau chief was released on bail but the report on the arrest of Abdelwahab was still unclear. Other reporters have also been targeted since the protests began. On Wednesday, Salim Younes, a staff photographer for the German broadcaster ZDF, was fired from his job after taking a photo of people in Khartoum demonstrating. Yesterday, the Associated Press’s journalist in Khartoum, Elodie Demuren, was detained by police for five hours.

The troubles in Sudan – a country that had been stable under Bashir’s rule but that for years has witnessed economic chaos – began a week ago after university students were attacked while protesting against high student tuition fees. Many mosques have become places of gathering for protesters, whose numbers swelled to more than 100,000 on Thursday, the largest protest in Sudan since the north became independent from South Sudan in 2011.

Read the full story at The Independent.

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